The Fresh Start Foundation is a Scottish not for profit group, helping child sexual abuse victims/survivors to achieve Truth & Justice and to support their recovery

CSA support, recovery, seeking truth & justice The Fresh Start Foundation is a Scottish not for profit group, helping child sexual abuse victims/survivors to achieve Truth & Justice and to support their recovery

Source: The Fresh Start Foundation is a Scottish not for profit group, helping child sexual abuse victims/survivors to achieve Truth & Justice and to support their recovery

Fresh Start Foundation The Peoples Independendent Child Abuse Inquiry Scotland

View The Roadshow Launch Here.

The People’s Independent Scottish Child Abuse Inquiry

Fresh Start Foundation Ltd, a not for profit company, is delighted to announce that we, together with partners, will be rolling out a programme of child sexual abuse & Satanist ritual abuse awareness road shows throughout Scotland from Spring 2018, with the message that we will not leave any Victims & Survivors behind.

The lack of engagement with the Scottish Government’s CSA Inquiry, speaks volumes that Victims & Survivors are suffering in silence in large numbers. We are inviting you to engage with us so that together we can reach out to Victims & Survivors, to empower them by giving them a voice, so that they do not have to suffer in silence any more.

Accordingly, Fresh Start Foundation would like to cordially invite you to our Press Event on Thursday 26th October 2017, at the SYHA Edinburgh Central, EH7 4AL https://www.facebook.com/syhahostellingscotland/app/137541772984354/  to announce the dates for these road shows and outline why it is so important that we all work together for Victims & Survivors.

We look forward to you playing your part in putting things right.

Please confirm by return email that you will be coming.

info@freshstartfoundation.co.uk 

Yours sincerely,

Andy Peacher
For and on behalf of Fresh Start Foundation Ltd, a not for profit company.

Tel 0300 999 2017

http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/scottish-news/victims-historic-child-abuse-scotland-10350757

 

 

 

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Press release 2 from the Fresh Start Foundation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brian Dailey Child Care worker jailed for children’s homes abuse in Edinburgh and Lanark

  • Brian Dailey

A man who went from job to job in care homes abusing children in Edinburgh and Lanark has been jailed for 10 years.

Brian Dailey, 70, assaulted and sexually molested children he was supposed to be looking after during abuse spanning a decade from 1973.

At the High Court in Edinburgh he was earlier found guilty of three indecency offences against boys and a girl and a further two charges of assault.

Dailey was placed on the sex offenders’ register indefinitely.

A judge told the pensioner: “You have been convicted of five charges which involve the persistent, calculated, manipulative and predatory sexual abuse of two young boys and one teenage girl in relation to all of whom you were in a clear position of trust.”

Stolen childhood

Lord Armstrong said the abuse inflicted on the boys included acts that would now be classified as rape and told the former councillor that he had callously robbed victims of their childhood.

The judge said that he took into account Dailey’s current age and that the offences were historical, but added: “Nevertheless these crimes of which you have been convicted are disturbing.”

Lord Armstrong said: “In the case of the boys you threatened them to ensure their silence.”

Police were first alerted to Dailey as a predator 25 years ago when the girl victim revealed he targeted her for sexual abuse.

He was also investigated over abuse allegations at a different home six years later and reported to prosecutors but no action was taken at the time.

Dailey, from Edinburgh, had originally denied a total of seven charges of indecent behaviour and assault involving five children during his earlier trial.

He was acquitted of two of the indecency charges against two boys on not proven verdicts but was found guilty of the other five offences.

He subjected his first victim to sexual abuse at a home in Lanark in 1973 and 1974 when the boy was aged 10 and 11. He carried out serious sex acts on the child and also attacked him and forced his head under water.

Dailey’s second victim was assaulted and sexually abused by him at a residential school run by an order of Catholic nuns in Edinburgh when he was aged seven and eight in 1974.

The third female victim was housed in a local authority children’s home in Edinburgh when she was subjected to repeated abuse from the age of 14 in 1982.

Defence counsel Derick Nelson said Dailey had been assessed now as posing a moderate risk of further offending and had health concerns.

He said: “Whatever the sentence imposed today it will, of course, be very difficult for him, particularly at his age.”

A spokesman for NSPCC Scotland said: “Justice has finally caught up with Dailey whose abhorrent crimes against a string of young and vulnerable children were not only reprehensible but an appalling abuse of trust.

“We hope his victims will feel some sort of solace following today’s sentence.

“Child abuse can have a devastating impact on victims, the ripple effects of which can last long into adulthood.

“It is never too late to speak out and it is vital that people who have suffered despicable abuse at the hands of criminals such as Dailey have the confidence to come forward by knowing that they will be listened to and supported by the authorities.”

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-edinburgh-east-fife-40739897

Legal Time bar on child Sexual abuse payouts lifted in Scotland

 

  • 4 October 2017
A child on a swing

A long-standing time bar which prevented victims of childhood abuse seeking civil legal action has been lifted.

Survivors of abuse which happened after 1964 previously only had a three-year window to pursue damages.

New laws coming into force have now changed that.

Community Safety Minister Annabelle Ewing said the time bar was “against the interests of justice for those who’d survived abuse”.

The three-year limit has been removed by the Limitation (Childhood Abuse) Bill.

The bill was unanimously approved, by a margin of 115 to zero, when MSPs voted in the Scottish Parliament in June.

It allows the time bar to be lifted so long as the victim was a child under the age of 18 when they suffered sexual, physical or emotional abuse.

Sued directly

The pursuer must also be the person who has been abused – so relatives of victims who have since died will not be able to seek damages.

The individual responsible for carrying out the abuse can be sued directly, but damages can also be sought against employers for their current or former employees.

The new law applies to anyone who suffered abuse on or after 26 September 1964, but not to victims who were abused before that date.

The Scottish government has estimated a potential 2,200 victims will be affected by the change in the law.

An independent Scottish Child Abuse Inquiry into historical child abuse is currently under way, led by judge Lady Smith.

More than 60 institutions, including several top private schools and church bodies, are being investigated.

‘Courage of survivors’

Annabelle Ewing added: “Child abuse is the most horrific betrayal of our young people and, even where such crimes were committed decades ago, we will do all we can to help survivors get the justice they deserve.

“Police Scotland and the Crown continue to work tirelessly to bring perpetrators to justice through our criminal courts.

“And, while it may not be the right way forward for all, survivors may now be considering the option of accessing justice through the civil courts.

“This legal milestone would not have happened but for the courage of many adult survivors whose persistence and dedication have shone a light on the dark realities of child abuse.”

Joanne McMeeking, from the Centre for Excellence for Looked After Children in Scotland (Celcis) at the University of Strathclyde, welcomed the introduction of the Act.

She said: “The abolishment of the time bar is the result of many years of successful campaigning by survivors.

“It is a welcome addition to the package of effective reparation as outlined in the Action Plan on Justice for victims of Historic Abuse of Children in Care.”

Original Source

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-41485863