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Brian Dailey Child Care worker jailed for children’s homes abuse in Edinburgh and Lanark

  • Brian Dailey

A man who went from job to job in care homes abusing children in Edinburgh and Lanark has been jailed for 10 years.

Brian Dailey, 70, assaulted and sexually molested children he was supposed to be looking after during abuse spanning a decade from 1973.

At the High Court in Edinburgh he was earlier found guilty of three indecency offences against boys and a girl and a further two charges of assault.

Dailey was placed on the sex offenders’ register indefinitely.

A judge told the pensioner: “You have been convicted of five charges which involve the persistent, calculated, manipulative and predatory sexual abuse of two young boys and one teenage girl in relation to all of whom you were in a clear position of trust.”

Stolen childhood

Lord Armstrong said the abuse inflicted on the boys included acts that would now be classified as rape and told the former councillor that he had callously robbed victims of their childhood.

The judge said that he took into account Dailey’s current age and that the offences were historical, but added: “Nevertheless these crimes of which you have been convicted are disturbing.”

Lord Armstrong said: “In the case of the boys you threatened them to ensure their silence.”

Police were first alerted to Dailey as a predator 25 years ago when the girl victim revealed he targeted her for sexual abuse.

He was also investigated over abuse allegations at a different home six years later and reported to prosecutors but no action was taken at the time.

Dailey, from Edinburgh, had originally denied a total of seven charges of indecent behaviour and assault involving five children during his earlier trial.

He was acquitted of two of the indecency charges against two boys on not proven verdicts but was found guilty of the other five offences.

He subjected his first victim to sexual abuse at a home in Lanark in 1973 and 1974 when the boy was aged 10 and 11. He carried out serious sex acts on the child and also attacked him and forced his head under water.

Dailey’s second victim was assaulted and sexually abused by him at a residential school run by an order of Catholic nuns in Edinburgh when he was aged seven and eight in 1974.

The third female victim was housed in a local authority children’s home in Edinburgh when she was subjected to repeated abuse from the age of 14 in 1982.

Defence counsel Derick Nelson said Dailey had been assessed now as posing a moderate risk of further offending and had health concerns.

He said: “Whatever the sentence imposed today it will, of course, be very difficult for him, particularly at his age.”

A spokesman for NSPCC Scotland said: “Justice has finally caught up with Dailey whose abhorrent crimes against a string of young and vulnerable children were not only reprehensible but an appalling abuse of trust.

“We hope his victims will feel some sort of solace following today’s sentence.

“Child abuse can have a devastating impact on victims, the ripple effects of which can last long into adulthood.

“It is never too late to speak out and it is vital that people who have suffered despicable abuse at the hands of criminals such as Dailey have the confidence to come forward by knowing that they will be listened to and supported by the authorities.”

Legal Time bar on child Sexual abuse payouts lifted in Scotland


  • 4 October 2017
A child on a swing

A long-standing time bar which prevented victims of childhood abuse seeking civil legal action has been lifted.

Survivors of abuse which happened after 1964 previously only had a three-year window to pursue damages.

New laws coming into force have now changed that.

Community Safety Minister Annabelle Ewing said the time bar was “against the interests of justice for those who’d survived abuse”.

The three-year limit has been removed by the Limitation (Childhood Abuse) Bill.

The bill was unanimously approved, by a margin of 115 to zero, when MSPs voted in the Scottish Parliament in June.

It allows the time bar to be lifted so long as the victim was a child under the age of 18 when they suffered sexual, physical or emotional abuse.

Sued directly

The pursuer must also be the person who has been abused – so relatives of victims who have since died will not be able to seek damages.

The individual responsible for carrying out the abuse can be sued directly, but damages can also be sought against employers for their current or former employees.

The new law applies to anyone who suffered abuse on or after 26 September 1964, but not to victims who were abused before that date.

The Scottish government has estimated a potential 2,200 victims will be affected by the change in the law.

An independent Scottish Child Abuse Inquiry into historical child abuse is currently under way, led by judge Lady Smith.

More than 60 institutions, including several top private schools and church bodies, are being investigated.

‘Courage of survivors’

Annabelle Ewing added: “Child abuse is the most horrific betrayal of our young people and, even where such crimes were committed decades ago, we will do all we can to help survivors get the justice they deserve.

“Police Scotland and the Crown continue to work tirelessly to bring perpetrators to justice through our criminal courts.

“And, while it may not be the right way forward for all, survivors may now be considering the option of accessing justice through the civil courts.

“This legal milestone would not have happened but for the courage of many adult survivors whose persistence and dedication have shone a light on the dark realities of child abuse.”

Joanne McMeeking, from the Centre for Excellence for Looked After Children in Scotland (Celcis) at the University of Strathclyde, welcomed the introduction of the Act.

She said: “The abolishment of the time bar is the result of many years of successful campaigning by survivors.

“It is a welcome addition to the package of effective reparation as outlined in the Action Plan on Justice for victims of Historic Abuse of Children in Care.”

Original Source

The Quarriers sweethearts reunited after 50 years who are overcoming their childhood abuse 

Childhood sweethearts Sandy Smith and Jayne Taylor-Savery have both been supported by Future Pathway, helping them come to terms with abuse in a children’s home.    UPDATED    09:51, 18 SEP 2017

Sandy Smith and Jayne Taylor-Savery

ALMOST fifty years after they first met in a children’s home where they were abused by staff, a couple have been reunited.

Sandy Smith and Jayne Taylor-Savery, both 65, were both residents at the Quarriers Children’s Home in Bridge of Weir. Quarriers is one of many organisations that has recently apologised to the Scottish Child Abuse Inquiry about physical and sexual abuse inflicted upon some children in its care.

More than 60 institutions in Scotland are currently being investigated.

But survivors of abuse in care can now access support from a £13.5 million Future Pathways fund set up by the Scottish Government.

Sandy and Jayne have both benefitted from the fund, which has helped them access practical and emotional support to ease their suffering, a legacy of the trauma they both suffered as children.

They found each other again four years ago after reconnecting on an online forum for former residents of Quarriers.

“It is amazing and wonderful,” says Sandy. “Jayne was the girl I’d wanted for my wife from the beginning and almost 50 years later we have fallen in love again.”

Jayne added: “We have so much in common – not least our time at Quarriers.”

Both Sandy and Jayne have battled emotional trauma as a result of their childhoods – both are divorced and Sandy has suffered from depression.

But finding each other and accessing help from Future Pathways has been their lifeline.

Quarriers Children’s Village in Bridge of Weir

“I don’t think I would have opened up if I didn’t have the protection of Future Pathways behind me,” says Jayne, who lives in Dundee.

Registered disabled, Jayne has received a mobility scooter by Future Pathways to improve her quality of life, which means Sandy no longer needs to push her wheelchair when they are out and can instead walk by her side.

And Sandy, who lost the use of one arm after a car accident, is set to undergo treatment to help him regain some mobility, again with funding from Future Pathways.

“They are compassionate and they are there 24-7. I am privileged to have Future Pathways in my life,” says Jayne.

Sandy adds: “When you are a victim there’s very little support and there’s so many people frightened to come forward to speak about it – it took me 50 years.

“But speak up for yourself, there’s nothing to be frightened of with Future Pathways there to offer support.”

Many victims of childhood abuse have grown up with opportunities denied, from basic education to the safety and security that others take for granted.

Hundreds have already come forward, but there could be hundreds more eligible for support.

Anyone over 18 who experienced abuse while living in care, which includes residential or foster care, boarding school – state or private – a long-term stay in hospital or time spent in a young offenders institution, can apply.





Hollie Demands Justice – Robert Green’s Blog Hollie Greig alleged in 2000 that she was the victim of a

Rosie Waterhouse
Rosie Waterhouse, 3rd degree connection
experienced journalist lecturer consultant
Our Lady’s RC High School Lancaster
Chester, United Kingdom


From: Robert Green
Sent: 25 September 2017 19:25
Subject: Fw: Rosie Waterhousei

Dear Mr Ivens,

This email concerns the disgraceful and misleading article in which unjustified attacks were made on both my reputation and that of Chief Constable Mike Veale, a gallant and professional police officer who is simply performing his duty in the face of nasty and ill-judged attacks from those who should know better.

Please feel free to contact me in the interests of fair play.

Yours sincerely,

Robert Green


From: Robert Green
Sent: 25 September 2017 19:10
To: Gillespie, James
Subject: Rosie Waterhousei

Dear James,

I shall be writing to the editor about both the attack on my reputation contained within the poorly-researched article published yesterday.

As I mentioned in our conversation, I was particularly disturbed to learn of Rosie Waterhouse as one of its co-authors.

Ms Waterhouse has a long and notorious record in trying to continuously undermine the credibility of those who come forward to report satanist ritual abuse (SRA), despite the number of proven convictions for this type of crime.

I have listened to the testimonies of many victims and the many of the alleged crimes committed against  them are simply too horrific to be widely spoken about in detail. Targets include the most vulnerable members of society including children, babies, foetuses and even some adults, who are often intimidated into silence by means of appalling threats or blackmail. The basic tactics of these criminals do not alter greatly.

Even more common, for obvious reasons, is the existence of the torture, mutilation and sacrifice of animals.

If the public were to learn the truth about the horror and scale of SRA, there would be a public outcry never before experienced in our country.

Instead, Rosie Waterhouse`s apparent mission is to use any means in order to publicly discredit probable victims. I suspect that your highlighted comment about the police interviewing “people who believe in satanic ritual abuse” as if it was merely a matter of personal opinion may be another example of this kind of inaccurate black propaganda, when the facts relating to convictions are quite clear that these types of crime not only exist, but are admitted by the Metropolitan Police as being under-reported.

Of course, you may show this email to Ms Waterhouse and she is free to make any comment she wishes in her defence. I do want to be fair about this concerning issue of misleading journalism.

I look forward to hearing from you about both a retraction over comments about me and clarification over the points that were clearly wrongly reported.

Yours sincerely,

Robert Green